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rates on americans. they're saying they're willing to raise revenue, but president obama has one criteria in this debate and that's raising income rates on all americans. right now, the sides are in their two corners on this and nobody is moving. so we're really only a couple weeks out and there's this huge gap, and eamon was right in another aspect. there is this brush fire of conservative lawmakers who don't want to raise revenue at all. so this is a huge problem for speaker john boehner, huge problem for president obama, and for the american economy. >> so right. does this come down to political opinion? is that going to be the sway factor? and if so, where is the political opinion? who gets that vote? >> polls in the united states show that raising taxes on the wealthy is an attractive proposition, a popular proposition. this might come down to december 28th or december 29th, december 30th where both sides are still locked in their corners and one side has to give. now, president obama ran his campaign on raising income rates, raising marginal income tax rates on americans. s
that. this is why president obama extend the tax rates for a year action because he said this could hurt the economy. here we are again. we're not anywhere different than we were last year really. >> gregg: donna, dick durbin, the senate's number two democrat, said that social security is off the table because i'm going to quote him here -- it does not add a penny to our deficit. that's ludicrus. >> i think that i'm unable to comment because i think the context may have something to do with the sense of lock box and where this money actually comes from and where it sits in the meanwhile before it gets spent. but i also think it's awfully important to remember that in terms of republican cooperation, the president really has been i think very sincere about seeking that cooperation and initially speaker boehner i think expressed with great sincerity his interest in cooperation. i dare say that there has been a lot of biplay among both the senators and the house members on what that cooperation is going to look like. but i do think it's awfully important that we not come out of this pr
the sequestration hanging over our heads. >> they constantly create a situation, try to blame obama. >> bill: kevin, do you think we dare say look, hold the line and if you don't raise rates on the top 2%, we're not going to make a deal? >> absolutely. hold the line. i'll gladly pay more taxes than to have some rich son of a bitch pay more. >> bill: you and me both. that's all right. i'm willing to do it. i am a patriotic millionaire. i ought to -- i should join the club. thanks, kevin for the call. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." which was just as you say -- maybe it was starve the beast. i'll look it up during the break. going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of
, not rates, and somewhat ideological, somewhat practical position on the obama side saying we can't get to $1.6 trillion without doing rates. now, we're not going to get to $1.6 trillion, so it becomes academic. >> can we get to $1.2 trillion where i think and others think we're going to end up without raising the rates? >> you can do it mathematically. it works. you can write laws that do it. the question you have to say to yourself, do you want to start eliminating charitable deductions for state and local taxes, for charitable, for health care, even, for retirement funds? in other words, do you really want to turn people's behavior kind of inside-out almost overnight by changing the way taxes work so quickly? >> mark, you're as plugged in as anybody in washington right now. are these guys talking to each other in a real, meaningful way? i know they put out the information that the president talked to john boehner yet, but are there real behind-the-scenes intense negotiations as we're now four weeks away from this thing? >> in talking to people so both sides yesterday, they had the identica
are requesting, what the heck is going on with the house and president obama. >> didn't we learn in 2011, where the government seemed less stable and our triple-a rating went down to a double-a rating and right now, john thune was right, it takes time to bush legislation through and we can't have a deal cut on christmas eve. >> is this brinksmanship on behalf of the president and time geithner, his treasury secretary, in terms of what the dems are now offering congress? >> no, i think the president has made a riegsal offer and of course, it's an opening offer, but that silence is deafening for the republicans, for the republicans' response. their political lemmings getting ready to go off the fiscal cliff and rather do that and not violate the no tax pledge they made to grover norquist than to move the ball forward and resolve this for the american people. >> is it really about that, angela and dick, is it really about the pledge that was made to grover norquist, no new taxes? we hear eric cantor saying no new taxes and we know that the dems want to have taxes on the wealthy and also know that
to get more money from wealthy people. president obama, you know the deal, he wants to raise tax rates for the wealthy. house speaker john boehner wants to close tax loopholes, limit deductions for the wealthy. let's stay on the hill here, let's talk to senior congressional correspondent dana bash. we know the speaker -- we know speaker boehner met with conservative republicans today. did he get any backlash today from his plan? >> reporter: you know what, interestingly it doesn't seem like he did. we know that conservatives are not happy with the idea that their own house republican leadership proposed a plan that includes $800 billion in new revenue. we have seen -- reported on it extensively yesterday and the day before about the e-mail alerts that conservative groups have put out, republican senator jim demint was up-front about the fact he's not happy about it. however, when it comes to speaker boehner's own republican conference, as it is called, we're told they met for an hour and there wasn't backlash, that they were united behind him. it seems as though, brooke, that the speak
with a report from newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top two percent go up. we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: in his first interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the republicans may present. but we are not going to simply cut our way to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan relies on $1.2 trillion in reduced
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)